Tsundoku

Learning is a multi-modal experience. What I mean by that is that true learning comes from absorbing information  – physically, mentally, with your eyes, your ears, touch etc. One of those modes is via reading. So you bought a few books from Hatsumi and other trusted sources. But did you READ them? or did they go on a shelf?  Have you gone back and re-read them?  Taken notes?  Highlighted pertinent passages?  Dog eared the pages that “speak” to you?  Applied the learnings in your training and ethos?  if not, why not?
 
Tsundoku (積ん読) is acquiring reading materials but letting them pile up in one’s home without reading them. The term originated in the Meiji era (1868–1912) as Japanese slang. It combines elements of tsunde-oku (積んでおく, to pile things up ready for later and leave) and dokusho (読書, reading books). It is also used to refer to books ready for reading later when they are on a bookshelf. As currently written, the word combines the characters for “pile up” (積) and the character for “read” (読).